A Great Catch

by Michael Okyere Asante
(Accra, Ghana)

Luke 5:1-11


Two brothers, Peter and Andrew, with their colleagues had been toiling all day and night for a catch but to no avail. In spite of the frustration and disappointment, they lend their boat to Jesus Christ (Luke 5).

Considering the frustration and disappointment resulting from the futile labour for fish, it would have been unusual for one to lend another his boat.

Despite this, Peter made his resources available for God’s use. Remember that Peter wasn’t a follower of Christ yet. If an unbeliever can give his resources for God’s use, how much more can we contribute to the work of the Lord? In our frustrations and disappointments can we offer ourselves and our resources for God’s use?

Often, we’re able to surrender all to Jesus when things are moving on smoothly; we’re able to give our monies when we have much. It is when we begin to face challenges, frustrations and disappointments that it becomes difficult. We no more give of ourselves to the Lord as we used to.

In Luke 5:1-5, Jesus Christ asked Peter to “release the nets into the water for a catch” (v. 4) Jesus’ instructions seemed unreasonable, because Peter and his colleagues had worked hard all night without a catch (v. 5). Despite this obvious circumstance, Peter put his absolute faith in Jesus:

"But because you say so, I will let down the nets." (v. 5b)

The result of this absolute faith in Christ was overwhelming:

"When they had done so, they caught such a large number of fish that their nets began to break." (v. 6)

Such was the massive result (a very great catch) that the net couldn’t contain the catch. They even had to seek the assistance of their colleagues; even that was not enough, because the boats in which the fishes were filled began to sink. (v. 6)

What would have been our response to Jesus’ command to launch the nets into the water, when we know we have combed all night through the waters without a catch?

Our pride would have taken over and we would have said, “What? Do you think we’re amateurs? We’ve been in this business for many years, and we are the best navigators of the Sea. What do you know about fishing? We’ve toiled all day and night, combed through the waters; what makes you think we would have a catch?” But Peter had faith in the words of the man of God. He acknowledged that humanly it was impossible, because they had done everything humanly possible to make a catch (v. 5a). Then, Peter made a faith-moving
statement:

"But because you say so, I will let down the nets." (v. 5b)

God says, "My thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are your ways my ways" (Is. 55:8), so when He asks you to do the seeming impossible or unreasonable, have faith that the thoughts He has towards you are thought of good, to bring you to an expected end (Jer. 29:11).

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